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Has anyone ever successfully turned a Markits wheel down to P4 standards?

 

Cheers,

 

David

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4 hours ago, Steamport Southport said:

 

Markits have now put the old catalogue back up.

 

http://www.markits.com/

 

There are a few Barclay wheels listed.

 

3'2" 10 spoke

3'3" 7 and 10 spoke

3'6" 10 and 13 spoke

 

 

 

Jason

I've heard, from somewhere, that they are ditching their horrible shiny tyres in favour of steel, which would be a vast improvement. Does anyone know if that's correct? Although I expect Barclay wheels are a bit of a slow seller and you'd get the old ones for a long time to come.

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16 minutes ago, Ruston said:

I've heard, from somewhere, that they are ditching their horrible shiny tyres in favour of steel, which would be a vast improvement. Does anyone know if that's correct? Although I expect Barclay wheels are a bit of a slow seller and you'd get the old ones for a long time to come.

 

The tyres are now stainless instead of the previous material (nickel silver?) so still shiny.

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3 hours ago, davknigh said:

Has anyone ever successfully turned a Markits wheel down to P4 standards?

 

Cheers,

 

David

David,

 

this has been under discussion on the S4 Forum.

 

As is the wheels are probably too wide to fit into splashers or behind outside valve gear if set to P4 B2B. IIRC the width of the wheel/tyre is also too wide to enable the front  to be turned down to get a more suitable tyre width without affecting the front of the spokes. 

 

Jol

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4 hours ago, davknigh said:

Has anyone ever successfully turned a Markits wheel down to P4 standards?

 

Cheers,

 

David

 

David

 

I seem to recall someone who was working to EM standards turning the flanges down to a much finer profile, think this was quite uncommon

 

I have a scratch built GWR Mogul loco (no tender), never been motorised, seems to have lathe turned Hambling'ish wheels with very fine treads (appx 0,75 mm), back to backs 17.4mm and wheel width 2 mm. Built at a time when some modellers had engineering skills and access to machinery  

 

Lathe turned Romford wheels were available in the 70's, though never to P4/S4 standards, just less course or was it to ensure they were centred a bit bettered ? 

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Markits wheels are a lot more accurately made than 1970s Romfords were and the flanges are smaller. I used to routinely skim Romfords before use, taking great care to use the same position on the same axle each time - the axles weren't brilliant either.

I haven't seen any steel tyred wheels although I know Mark was talking about the possibility, the n/s bar is very expensive and the machining process somewhat wasteful.

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The latest batch of 14mm driving wheels from Markits have steel tyres, I gather they are slowly being phased in and new batches of all driving wheels (and full sets of pony/driving wheels) will feature steel tyres. 

 

Paul A. 

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A disassembled 14 inch Barclay is now on the bench in the High Level lab. A chassis for this is going to be quite a challenge.

 

At this stage, it’s looking like the brakes, springs and cylinder/Slidebar assemble from the RTR model will be reused. The mech is not so much of a problem, but locating the leaf springs, which on the Hatton’s model sit ‘outside’ the wheels, will be tricky. Taking it apart to preserve the existing parts is no mean feat!

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4 minutes ago, High Level Kits said:

A disassembled 14 inch Barclay is now on the bench in the High Level lab. A chassis for this is going to be quite a challenge.

 

At this stage, it’s looking like the brakes, springs and cylinder/Slidebar assemble from the RTR model will be reused. The mech is not so much of a problem, but locating the leaf springs, which on the Hatton’s model sit ‘outside’ the wheels, will be tricky. Taking it apart to preserve the existing parts is no mean feat!

 

Will that give enough clearance for EM and P4 modellers?

 

Gordon A

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Just building a low rider at the moment, but I have no model oil.

 

But I have a lot of 5W30 (car takes 8l), would this be safe for the axle bearings?

 

Well it is that EP90, cold climate hydraulic oil, compressor oil, or grease.

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Or is there anything on Ebay or Amazon?

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31 minutes ago, MJI said:

Just building a low rider at the moment, but I have no model oil.

 

But I have a lot of 5W30 (car takes 8l), would this be safe for the axle bearings?

 

Well it is that EP90, cold climate hydraulic oil, compressor oil, or grease.

Eileens?

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, High Level Kits said:

Taking it apart to preserve the existing parts is no mean feat!

 

Poop!

 

Mine fell apart. Without physical assistance in some instances.

 

 

1708492423_AB-MedallingPwD-003-EditSm.jpg.fbdf17425c3495d646d9bd96c00f4463.jpg

 

202586925_AB-MedallingPwD-093-EditSm.jpg.642c9e452591d66169712f18b0ca797b.jpg

 

1491357001_AB-MedallingPwD-083-EditSm.jpg.358f45d4d5bc8f156a04d26c1768be86.jpg

 

179693849_AB-MedallingPwD-070-EditSmII.jpg.df297123679e4c17c2eaad284767ca19.jpg

 

If there's any spare space on the etch maybe it's worth considering including a cab back sheet  (with half etched coal hole?) just to cure the transparent nature of the Hattons cab under back-lighting?

 

209203804_AB-MedallingPwD-130-EditSm.jpg.91832924c6c0b5640577edd2e60ea6ae.jpg

 

Finally, a pic of the outside of the High Level labs showing nobody flaunting current restrictions. What it doesn't show is the frantic work going on inside, with the many staff risking life & limb to complete this highly important work under the current national emergency!

 

HighLevelBillyLab1.jpg.409dd1c60ac194b45011a54c76ce4d7d.jpg

 

HighLevelDA.jpg.5215535c8dde08e80be5c5fd6996d4d2.jpg

 

Stand by for another scintillating socially distanced conversation tomorrow. Who knows, I might spend some money with ya?

 

P

 

Chris, Forgot to say, AB-1890 is a 1926 loco. Just the drawing from 1921 was updated. Also the Hattons Crosshead is too long.

Edited by Porcy Mane
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Just in the process of trying out one of High Level's 3 pole new motors

 

73.jpeg.f7bebdd25373c9d40b82d3a6b523ff76.jpeg

 

This is the 1015 they also do a slightly larger one 1020 both priced at £9.50

 

74.jpeg.6044dd71e852f62d97cc75092abcbe1c.jpeg

 

Put one in a Southeastern Finecast LSWR 02 chassis using a Road Runner Compact + gearbox, not yet fitted pickups and no body even started yet but with wires attached runs very well, certainly an answer for the very small tank locos, I assume anything larger than an 02 and the 1020 might be a better choice.

 

 

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Porcy, I can tell you mine didn’t fall apart, in fact, there may have even been a pipe glued between the footplate and boiler preventing removal of the chassis.

 

The likelihood is that I’ll be trying to re-use all the plastic parts that plug into the chassis; cylinder assembly, crosshead and slidebars will run together and will save customers a hell of a lot of work, as well re-using the brakes. People are just not up for that amount of work these days.

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Posted (edited)
44 minutes ago, High Level Kits said:

I can tell you mine didn’t fall apart, in fact, there may have even been a pipe glued between the footplate and boiler preventing removal of the chassis.

 

I dunno. The yoof of today.  Attention from a decent set of tweezers had those injectors begging for mercy in seconds.

 

44 minutes ago, High Level Kits said:

The likelihood is that I’ll be trying to re-use all the plastic parts that plug into the chassis; cylinder assembly, crosshead and slidebars will run together and will save customers a hell of a lot of work, as well re-using the brakes.

 

Good choice. With the wheels and coupling rods being electrically live that gives us the options of popping on one of the new type Ultrascale tyres to the original wheels.

 

44 minutes ago, High Level Kits said:

People are just not up for that amount of work these days.

 

Never mind talking. Just keep cracking the whip with the drawing office team. Get the cads sorted so they're on the etchers doorstep the moment they return to work.

 

I want to see daylight under my boilers.

 

Porcy Verance

Edited by Porcy Mane
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Hi Chris,

 

Phil, has tried to ring you, but there appears to be a problem with your phone, he sent you an email instead with his shopping list, but has not included any card details.

 

SS

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Siberian Snooper said:

Phil, has tried to ring you, but there appears to be a problem with your phone,

 

The technical name for that is "Porcy Avoidance".

 

( I didn't get a chance to ring you Chris.  Kitchen Crisis x 2)

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A question , if I may , regarding Hornblocks from High level Kits . I have assembled a set of these and want to seek clarification as to how tight the bearing should be in the guide . I can move the bearing up and down using an axle but it has a fair degree of resistance - is this correct or should it be loose enough to drop under its own weight onto the keeper wire ? 

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It should drop under its own weight, but not be too sloppy. The aim is to avoid any sideways movement at all costs. In my experience, very little adjustment is required to achieve a good fit.

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Thanks for your reply , Middlepeak , I will tweak mine a bit more 

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It’s been a very busy six weeks or so, mail order-wise, so we’re having to take a week off (9tht to 17th May) to re-organise things, replenish stock and maybe take a breather. This definately isn’t us shutting up shop and as soon as the new parts arrive, things will be as normal.

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All the best, have a good quiet week.

 

In the meantime here is a cardboard gearbox in a cardboard loco. 

 

1617245392_670mockup.JPG.ddf3b4f91c062169d2df2a714f48bd47.JPG

 

Perhaps not as daft as it looks, shows how useful the printable gearbox planning sheet is. 

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