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EFE Rail Winter 2020 Announcements - Beattie Well Tank, Gate Stock, Class 58, Cargowaggons plus 2 new N gauge projects.


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Ironically my 4MT that I got from eBay turned out to be pretty rough and noisy. The solution was to send it to Sams Trains as he used to do repairs , I don’t know if he still does.  It came back perfect . He has since restored some old  Tri-ang  and Wrenn locos for me so he’s a fairly competent repairer. 
 

I thought his review of the Well tank was maybe a bit rough , but at the end of the day it is plastic, doesn’t have huge hauling power and is relatively expensive compared to Peckett , Hattons industrials etc . So he’s not wrong. 
 

Like everything else , watch it and make up your own mind. 

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Re standard 4mt tanks, they were on the North Cornwall line from 1962 onwards so it's just possible to have one and a BWT together....

 

Just had to go and run one of my (original Kernow release) well tanks tonight, looks good pulling an authentic length train of a few wagons.  I did dig the small Kernow box out, and guess what, it will store the loco with tension lock couplings fitted!

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II got my new lined Southern BWT last week. No major problems with it with regard to bits missing or stuck on crookedly and the livery is applied very nicely. A little bit of painting around the buffers will help them to blend in with rest of the loco and hide their plastic-ness, plus some weathering of the brake gear and other below footplate fittings.

I agree with Sam's comment about the rear splasher going right across the cab. I wonder if any of the figure makers have produced a crew that will take that into account and help to hide the problem ? I do not remember noticing that on my original Kernow one.

I got around to testing it yesterday and it works ok and the only issue is I think that it runs very fast on the minimum power, albeit using a fairly basic controller which I use to test everything. I would say that tested in the same way I have found that Hattons  Andrew Barclay and Hornby's Pecketts also run faster than I would expect. One of the best locos for slow running and shunting is in my opinion, is the original Dapol tooled Terrier, 50.5 to 1 gearing if I recall. Far better than the new Rails or Hornby ones, so one saving grace.

 

Ray

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May be I’ve just been lucky but the pulling power of my Beattie Tank is fine for what I want it to do.

 

For such a small engine how many coaches do you want it to pull. ?

 

Here is a video showing it pulling 5 coaches no problem, struggles but does pull 7.

 

It couldn’t possibly be anything to do with Sam’s track, could it . ?

 

 Interesting to note the original Dapol Well Tank with 5 pole motor and weighing 5 grams more has no problem with 7 coaches.

 

 

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7 minutes ago, Yankee said:

May be I’ve just been lucky but the pulling power of my Beattie Tank is fine for what I want it to do.

 

For such a small engine how many coaches do you want it to pull. ?

 

Precisely. The loaded Wenfordbridge trips for which they were famously successful were pretty much downhill all the way to Wadebridge. These are lovely little engines for a particular purpose, so loading them up as if they were equivalent to a pannier or a jinty is missing their point. The green is a jolly if whimsical addition this time round. 

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19 hours ago, scumcat said:

I always wonder why some modellers scoff at running on the carpet. It is were I started and probably many others, my kids who are 5 and 8 love Sams videos because it is accessible to them and actually parts are aimed at them, why would we not want to encourage the next generation. Sam gave my son a shout out a couple of weeks ago he was made up and played sams trains for hours down on the floor. 

Getting on for 70 years ago I have vague memories of one make of toy trains being described as for table top use. It would seem that old message needs to be revived. 

Bernard

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34 minutes ago, Bernard Lamb said:

Getting on for 70 years ago I have vague memories of one make of toy trains being described as for table top use. It would seem that old message needs to be revived. 

Bernard

 

It is interesting the perception here in the UK - there is an American model railroad thread on Reddit where carpet and table top layouts are incredibly common and never criticised.

 

Roy

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I hear temporary floor and table layouts are common in Japan too, due to house sizes, and smaller houses and flats is a direction the UK has been heading in for some time.

 

For clarity Sam's Trains layout has a gradient (i.e. a sloping floor), and that is where the BWT runs out of traction. Has anyone got any performance data on a quantified gradient? Pulling 5 coaches on the flat is not the full story for those wanting to go uphill.

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3 hours ago, wainwright1 said:

 

I agree with Sam's comment about the rear splasher going right across the cab. I wonder if any of the figure makers have produced a crew that will take that into account and help to hide the problem ? I do not remember noticing that on my original Kernow one.

 

 

Ray

 

Like the real one then....

 

Just shows how nonsensical the review is. No knowledge of what the real thing even is. To most of these reviewers they are just pretty coloured toy trains.

 

https://collection.sciencemuseumgroup.org.uk/objects/co205775/steam-locomotive-beattie-well-tank-steam-locomotive

 

If he means it goes right across then can he kindly tell us how to to avoid it on such a small model.

 

 

 

Jason

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1 hour ago, Steamport Southport said:

 

Like the real one then....

 

If he means it goes right across then can he kindly tell us how to to avoid it on such a small model.

 

 

 

Jason

 

Not entirely like the real one, but in the same breath its not something that a crew fitted in the cab can't hide.

 

I didn't take away from it that he meant across the cab access, he clearly meant across the width of the cab as he started chuntering on about how do you put coal in the firebox when there is a hulking great lump of plastic through the entire cab. That is something which was brought up when these models first surfaced, so its not exactly breaking news.

 

re: the traction, I wonder how much of an influence that sprung front axle has in lifting the front drivers, there were instances in his video where it appeared to begin to slip even running light. If traction is that much of an issue then softening the spring should help somewhat, as would some extra ballast in the bunker. My Austerity is similar, very light and poorly balanced, it just shows up less on a 6 wheel driven chassis.

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2 hours ago, Zunnan said:

 

Not entirely like the real one, but in the same breath its not something that a crew fitted in the cab can't hide.

 

I didn't take away from it that he meant across the cab access, he clearly meant across the width of the cab as he started chuntering on about how do you put coal in the firebox when there is a hulking great lump of plastic through the entire cab. That is something which was brought up when these models first surfaced, so its not exactly breaking news.

 

re: the traction, I wonder how much of an influence that sprung front axle has in lifting the front drivers, there were instances in his video where it appeared to begin to slip even running light. If traction is that much of an issue then softening the spring should help somewhat, as would some extra ballast in the bunker. My Austerity is similar, very light and poorly balanced, it just shows up less on a 6 wheel driven chassis.

 

My 3 locos front axle springs quite easily. I can crank the controller up to full whack suddenly and there is no wheel slip with no load. Maybe his wiper pickups on the front axle are a little too tight preventing the front axle turning and lifting the loco front drivers up a tad.

I will admit that there are design features of that chassis which I'm not at all a fan of but then I seem to remember the character involved in this design. To me its N gauge practice scaled up to OO. They do run smooth though and are adequate for the loads expected. Just need that road van to finish off my china clay train.

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8 hours ago, wainwright1 said:

II got my new lined Southern BWT last week. No major problems with it with regard to bits missing or stuck on crookedly and the livery is applied very nicely. A little bit of painting around the buffers will help them to blend in with rest of the loco and hide their plastic-ness, plus some weathering of the brake gear and other below footplate fittings.

I agree with Sam's comment about the rear splasher going right across the cab. I wonder if any of the figure makers have produced a crew that will take that into account and help to hide the problem ? I do not remember noticing that on my original Kernow one.

I got around to testing it yesterday and it works ok and the only issue is I think that it runs very fast on the minimum power, albeit using a fairly basic controller which I use to test everything. I would say that tested in the same way I have found that Hattons  Andrew Barclay and Hornby's Pecketts also run faster than I would expect. One of the best locos for slow running and shunting is in my opinion, is the original Dapol tooled Terrier, 50.5 to 1 gearing if I recall. Far better than the new Rails or Hornby ones, so one saving grace.

 

Ray

Probably  because it had closed cab doors.

Bernard

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There are a number of observations here, regarding the EFE Well tank and responses.

Firstly you all know mine was leaning to one side and I made the mistake of asking if there was a fix.

Well later I have discovered there might have been, another YouTube channel had the same issue and found the wheel bearing had not been fully pushed home in the chassis. So in case this might help someone else I am recording the idea here and now.

 

I have read all the comments about a younger YouTube reviewer.

For me, his points were perfectly valid from a ‘new to the loco’ person.

And in fact, the poor plastic mouldings and bad decoration were in my opinion worthy of pointing out.

The fact he runs on a carpet is down to him, I am just jealous he has the knees that can do it lol

But some of the comments here were uncalled for, all these folk that watched it with an ‘angry from Surrey’ intention.

Model railways takes all sorts and everyone can have a view and opinion, the channel in question appeals ‘massively’ to just the sort of audience we need to be in the hobby and keeping it alive.

 

Now, while I wait nervously for my replacement Well tank, has his review put me off? No, not really I still want it for what it represents and I am confident it will do all I ask of it.

But is it worth the RRP given its all plastic? Only if you have that money to spare I guess.

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Interesting comments referring to the haulage capacity, and indeed comparisons with Sam's Trains' comments.

 

I would have expected 3 or 4 carriages to be typical, surely rarely more than 4?

 

Were I to purchase one, I wouldn't expect it to be matching a Flying Scotsman or A2 or P2, and not a Pannier or Jinty either, that's not the point.

 

The basics are there and it's a nice little locomotive, but ... 

 

Al.

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3 hours ago, mikesndbs said:

There are a number of observations here, regarding the EFE Well tank and responses.

Firstly you all know mine was leaning to one side and I made the mistake of asking if there was a fix.

Well later I have discovered there might have been, another YouTube channel had the same issue and found the wheel bearing had not been fully pushed home in the chassis. So in case this might help someone else I am recording the idea here and now.

 

I have read all the comments about a younger YouTube reviewer.

For me, his points were perfectly valid from a ‘new to the loco’ person.

And in fact, the poor plastic mouldings and bad decoration were in my opinion worthy of pointing out.

The fact he runs on a carpet is down to him, I am just jealous he has the knees that can do it lol

But some of the comments here were uncalled for, all these folk that watched it with an ‘angry from Surrey’ intention.

Model railways takes all sorts and everyone can have a view and opinion, the channel in question appeals ‘massively’ to just the sort of audience we need to be in the hobby and keeping it alive.

 

Now, while I wait nervously for my replacement Well tank, has his review put me off? No, not really I still want it for what it represents and I am confident it will do all I ask of it.

But is it worth the RRP given its all plastic? Only if you have that money to spare I guess.

See the other problem is the fact he thinns it should have thd pulling strength of something like a terrier or jinty, those are the main issues why a lot of us took the mickey wirh his review, he doesn't focus on the model's prototypical basis and comapres any model to ones that make no sense of comparison, and on his news video didn't bother to mention about the 30 quid deposit when moaning about the price of the Rails/Locomotion Bachmann LNWR Jumbo.

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45 minutes ago, 9402 Fredrick said:

See the other problem is the fact he thinns it should have thd pulling strength of something like a terrier or jinty, those are the main issues why a lot of us took the mickey wirh his review, he doesn't focus on the model's prototypical basis and comapres any model to ones that make no sense of comparison, and on his news video didn't bother to mention about the 30 quid deposit when moaning about the price of the Rails/Locomotion Bachmann LNWR Jumbo.

real locomotive 
Beattie well tank Tractive effort 11,050 lbf (49.2 kN)

terrier tractive effort Various between 7,650 lbf and 10,695 lbf 

 

sam does mention in the video that the prototype pulling power is comparable so he is probably right to compare the two models based on these figures

i don’t remember him comparing it to a jinty, he showed Smokey joe and a peckett 

 

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13 hours ago, Bernard Lamb said:

Getting on for 70 years ago I have vague memories of one make of toy trains being described as for table top use. It would seem that old message needs to be revived. 

Bernard

That’s ok but my table top isn’t big enough :(

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7 hours ago, scumcat said:

That’s ok but my table top isn’t big enough :(

Families tended to be much larger in those days.:D

Grandma had a farmhouse table that could be opened up by turning a handle attached to a long threaded rod and a spare section inserted. At full size it was bigger than an 8 x 4 board.

 

I take Sam with a very large pinch of salt. He is trying to flog his services and as such needs to be a bit controversial. I got as far as the comment regarding   coreless motors. That immediately tells me who he is aiming at. Funnily enough the adverts flagged up another video in which he heaped praise on the Rapido J70.

Bernard

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14 hours ago, Bernard Lamb said:

Probably  because it had closed cab doors.

Bernard

Hi Bernard.

 

The moulding for the rear splasher actually extends right across the width of the cab with no gap for the fire hole area. So there is only a small amount of flat floor space is available to fit a couple of crew figures towards the rear of the cab.

 

Ray

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22 hours ago, stovepipe said:

I hear temporary floor and table layouts are common in Japan too, due to house sizes, and smaller houses and flats is a direction the UK has been heading in for some time.

 

For clarity Sam's Trains layout has a gradient (i.e. a sloping floor), and that is where the BWT runs out of traction. Has anyone got any performance data on a quantified gradient? Pulling 5 coaches on the flat is not the full story for those wanting to go uphill.

 

Japanese track such as Kato has moulded bases which reduces the risk of dust and fluff from the floor getting into mechanisms, and the sturdy clip-together track sections seem designed for regular assembly and dismantling.

 

Over 50 years ago 'my' first railway used Tri-ang track which clipped together; my father cut a large piece of hardboard which went between the carpet and the track.  I think it was kept in the shed when out of use and brought into the living room when needed.

 

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I have the Beattie with square splashes, Late BR. I've found that it sits lower at the rear, so the rear buffers are about 2mm lower than the front, when checked to a common source. Only checked this as I thought that the boiler seemed to be off level, lower at the fiebox end. The front wheels are sprung, so you can't check if a set of driving  wheels is seated wrongly. Is this a common feature?

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1 hour ago, sjp23480 said:

Hi,


Does anyone know when the Southern livery gate stock will arrive in stores (EFE E86002)?  Hoping to pick one up in time to gift as a Christmas present.

 

Many thanks

Steve

 

This week apparently according to rails. I'm looking forwards to getting a set myself.

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