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Andy Y

New brand, new model - Rails Limited - LNER Dynamometer car

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What I saw of the 3D print at the weekend this looks like it's going to be a cracking model but surely the recommended retail price is way way off the chart recorder!

 

As my pal remarked, surely it could have been priced at £126.00

 

Come on Rails of Sheffield. Get yourselves up to speed!!!!

 

P

Edited by Porcy Mane
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I have no need for one on my modern image depot. But having seen the model at York it looks fantastic.

I must resist I must resist I must resist I must resist.

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Incidentally, I'd dearly love to be proved wrong when Locomotion announce their new models at York. A return to the 'good old days' when the NRM blew us away with DP1, City of Truro, Midland Compound etc would be very welcome. Tarted up versions of old or flawed tooling (Class 66, Class 20, Dean Goods etc) doesn't really cut it, IMO.

 

I don't think that's the case. I think its a case of you can do both so Locomotion is to get the greater benefit. I know that one engine is being looked at by one company which is suggesting that more engines are being done specifically for Locomotion.

 

So far, two companies have done specific new tooled engines to be released via Shildon. Others, including one of those two, have done engines that exist in the main range but have a member of the national collection, so models have been produced and then released via the NRM, with the class mates going to regular retailers.

 

If the NRM sign off on other retailers being able to model an item in the collection they could still ask for loyalties, as they currently own it, much like companies have loyalties and fees for their logos to be produced. If not, they might just having read this!

 

Really, it looks like there could be cost cutting and simplification, to boost the overall profit margin and income to the NRM. Don't forget that Locomotion are offering models that are in the main range too as a retailer, so effectively competing against the market retailers that are established. I would think really that more freedom is needed to the manager of Locomotion, to use its brand to make it an excellent retailer that has the capability to have headline models that bring people to its stand and website, to get market share.

 

All interesting, but still sorry to be seeing Sandra go.

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The route also became useful for testing locos, so the likes of GT3 and the Helan protoypes took their turns (ably helped by a dyno car)....

 

Now look here !!!!

 

Everyone knows that it was the S&DJR that was strengthened during WW2, and was subsequently used as a semi-retirement home for out-dated first generation diesels, and a testing ground for prototype motive power.

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

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.

 

I will be interested to see how the clerestory comes out - IF they can do that feature well without too many complicated assembly parts/steps then MAYBE we might get some up-to-date pre-grouping clerestorys/clerestories  -  here's hoping.

 

.

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I hope the rendering of the teak finish is as good on the production models

as it is on Rails colour advertisement. Very subtle.

 

Now where's that 50 quid !.

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Now look here !!!!

 

Everyone knows that it was the S&DJR that was strengthened during WW2, and was subsequently used as a semi-retirement home for out-dated first generation diesels, and a testing ground for prototype motive power.

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

 

In my defence John, I will say that you used to live in the same locality as me, so our thoughts must originate from the same source!

 

Stewart

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In my defence John, I will say that you used to live in the same locality as me, so our thoughts must originate from the same source!

 

Stewart

 

We did indeed - and I've just got back from there; a family visit over Easter.

 

At one time, I used to think of Cambridge as a relative backwater - by contrast to Bodmin, its a veritable teeming metropolis.

 

I know which I prefer nowadays !!

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

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They will have plastic bogie sideframes with factory fitted metal wheels and pick-ups. The connection between the body and lighting circuit (which is in the roof) is done with spring-loaded plungers, meaning that there are no wires to contend with should you want to remove the roof.

Bill 

 

So Bill... Have you got used to saying "factory fitted" yet?

 

This is a constant source of trans-Atlantic translational issues at Rapido. In North America we say "factory installed," and in the UK we say "factory fitted." (We also put punctuation inside the quotation marks in "Canada.")

 

Unfortunately a few "factory fitteds" have found their way into American adverts, and one or two "factory installeds" made their way into UK adverts. I wonder what the American readers thought of factory fitted... "I should hope the parts bl**dy well fit. What kind of a selling point is that?"

 

-Jason

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I hope the rendering of the teak finish is as good on the production models

as it is on Rails colour advertisement. Very subtle.

 

Now where's that 50 quid !.

 

I was planning on giving them all to my five year old along with a box of crayons. 

 

I was overruled. 

 

-Jason

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I was planning on giving them all to my five year old along with a box of crayons. 

 

I was overruled. 

 

-Jason

Hang on, I thought that you said he was doing the decoration artwork? :>)

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In my parallel universe, after 1959 the M&GN DID remain open, and some upgrading (such as weak bridges) was done. Some interesting dieselisation took place...

The LMS twins and Bulleids were kept in service, seeing use on the heavier through trains. As were the class 44 - nominally in the Leicester area anyway, but instead of being downgraded to coal traffic, saw use on these passenger turns. The class 28s, originally on Midland lines, were not wholly banished to Cumbria, but were also used on lesser trains, and goods, on the M&GN. Staple Midland locos such as the 27s & 25s were also used. The route also became useful for testing locos, so the likes of GT3 and the Helan protoypes took their turns (ably helped by a dyno car)....

 

Stewart

 

(not forgetting the regular diet of Flying Pigs and 4Fs that far outnumbered sighting of the diseasels)

 

Oh, very nice!

 

I have a fantasy M&GN, too, set in about 1970, which has largely abandoned freight, and followed the ECML in closing all the halts (those stations a mile or so away from the villages whose names they carried), and instead focuses on passenger traffic attracted as an alternative to Norfolk's dreadful roads.

 

So we have lots of odd early DMUs and, bizarrely, cast-off Claytons topping-and-tailing hourly shuttle services running Norwich-Lynn-Peterborough. I'm afraid the Yarmouth branch has closed. The Leicester has acquired a 37 and Mk2s, though.

 

It's a delightful world. :)

 

Paul

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Decision was easy. The locomotive trials are a great excuse for both the dynamometer car and my somewhat eclectic collection of locomotives to be seen in deepest Cornwall, ex LSWR territory.  And no problems with the Web site. Being in Australia the time zone helps!

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So Bill... Have you got used to saying "factory fitted" yet?

 

This is a constant source of trans-Atlantic translational issues at Rapido. In North America we say "factory installed," and in the UK we say "factory fitted." (We also put punctuation inside the quotation marks in "Canada.")

 

Unfortunately a few "factory fitteds" have found their way into American adverts, and one or two "factory installeds" made their way into UK adverts. I wonder what the American readers thought of factory fitted... "I should hope the parts bl**dy well fit. What kind of a selling point is that?"

 

-Jason

 

I expect to see "factory installed" when the part is electronic and "factory fitted" when it is a detailed part otherwise your advertising, Box bla bla and user guides will be considered "not fit for purpose"!

 

When I moved to France, the locals said that I had "installed" myself there, which conjured up some fanciful ideas like as if I had been plugged into a wall or something.

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I expect to see "factory installed" when the part is electronic and "factory fitted" when it is a detailed part otherwise your advertising, Box bla bla and user guides will be considered "not fit for purpose"!

 

When I moved to France, the locals said that I had "installed" myself there, which conjured up some fanciful ideas like as if I had been plugged into a wall or something.

As I understand it from a US perspective but with some UK terminology knowledge, "fitted" and "installed" generally mean the same thing. Fitted in my US understanding is a form of the verb "to fit" or used as an adverb and is usually applied to clothes and sometimes modified cars/automobiles although "tricked out" is now used commonly for the latter and even sometimes the former.  As for someone having a fit about the instructions being "fit for purpose", there are lawyers, attorneys, barristers and solicitors on both sides of the Atlantic who will take up any cause when they smell cash.

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How about, "nailed on by the factory"?

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How about, "nailed on by the factory"?

 

Or  "Squeezed on tenderly at the factory by a vice"

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Has a nice good look at the real thing in the NRM today, I'd not noticed the rather sizeable cracks in some of the panels. I'm glad the model is representing the coach in service and not had its wooden panels afflicted by the ravages of time.

 

The sample at the York show was absolutely glorious, and I really can't wait to see the decorated samples, and more so, see mine arrive into my grubby little hands!

 

Cheers

 

J

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I have no need for one on my modern image depot. But having seen the model at York it looks fantastic.

I must resist I must resist I must resist I must resist.

 

resistance is futile..........

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I

 

And I'm quite sure that Rapido/NRM are more than capable of sorting that.

Hopefully so, but never forget the efforts that the late John Edgson went to with Hornby and the Gresley vestibuled (gangwayed) carriages and how when it came to production the turnunder was virtually absent, with beading in the wrong position and on the Teak versions certain panelling having the grain running in the wrong direction...

 

Mike Trice subsequently worked closely with Hornby to ensure that the non-vestibuled (non-gangwayed) Gresley carriages were accurate and such major errors avoided.

 

So I can quite understand the emphasis on getting things correct before production and so we should respect Mike for his positive input.

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